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Thursday, November 20, 2014

Rare photo of Francisco Lemos

For any collector, there are always some missing items you'd like to have.  I have a lot of "holes" in my collection, but one of those holes was filled this week, thanks to Charlene Stacy and her sharp eyes.
I had a rather poor scan of a war-time portrait of Francisco Lemos; my scan was pretty awful, and very low-resolution.  Given the importance of Lemos to our history, I really wanted a new, better scan.
Charlene Stacy happened to see a copy of a photo of Lemos at the recent sale at Schreiner University, and picked it up before it was, well, lost forever.  She has graciously allowed me to scan that original copy.  Below is my scan, complete with the removal of the tear in the photo -- which was represented in the copy of the original.  While this is a third generation of the original, it's a lot better than what I had before.  Thanks, Mrs. Stacy!
Click on image to enlarge
Francisco Lemos, World War I hero

The new marker for his grave
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Wednesday, November 12, 2014

One foot of Kerrville's railroad

A good friend at the City of Kerrville brought by one foot of the railroad rail from part of the San Antonio and Aransas Pass Railroad line which served Kerrville until the early 1970s.  I am old enough to remember the trains which traveled to Kerrville about once a week.  This part of the track was used for many years, and I'm glad to add it to my collection of Kerrville and Kerr County items.
Click on image to enlarge
Part of the rail line which once served Kerrville and Kerr County.
"That's real Kerrville dirt on there," he told me. Don't think I'll wash it off.  Many loads of livestock, wool, and mohair traveled over this piece of iron.

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Monday, November 10, 2014

50 years of ink and paper

Pat and Joe Herring, Sr., in the early 1960s.
On November 10, 1964, my parents, Joe and Pat Herring, opened a printing company in Kerrville, Texas.  The little print shop they started on that day is still going strong, and I'm proud of all they accomplished.  Today is the 50th anniversary of the founding of the company.
They had a toddler son (me), and a daughter on the way (my sister, Judy), and they decided to start their own business.  The reason: they wanted to raise their family in Kerrville.
Their first office was in the old Tivy Hotel on Tivy Street in Kerrville; in 1965 they purchased the Hunter Printing Company, which was located at 615 Water Street.  Later, they bought the building housing the print shop, then the building next to that building, and finally, the parking lot next to that building.
Herring Printing Company as it appeared in the mid 1970s
Over the past five decades the company has employed hundreds of people, served thousands of customers, and contributed in many ways to the community.
On behalf of my family, thanks -- we really appreciate your support, your business, but most of all, your friendship.
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Tuesday, October 14, 2014

Two who gave their lives

The Tivy High School Class of 1964 will be holding its 50th year reunion this year, during the homecoming festivities October 24th.  Dianne Meeker DeBarros, a member of that class, sent along photographs of the Vietnam War Memorial in Washington, and the names of two of her classmates killed in that conflict.  They were so young when they died, and it's difficult to avoid wondering what their lives might have been had they not been in Southeast Asia those many years ago.  The two of her classmates memorialized on the Memorial are Robert Glen Chenault and Anthony Kunz.  While there were other Kerrville men who died in that war, these were in the Tivy graduating class of 1964.
Thanks, Dianne, for sending these photos for all of us to share -- and for remembering these brave young men.
Click on any image to enlarge
Anthony E. Kunz, member of the THS Class of '64

Robert Glen Chenault, member of the THS Class of '64



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Friday, October 10, 2014

The Top 10 most read stories on this website

Sometime on Friday, October 10, 2014, one of the pages of this blog will be opened, and that action will mark the 300,000th page view of this material.  (A page view is defined on Wikipedia like this:a request to load a single HTML file (web page) of an Internet site.)  So far that has happened 300,000 times on this little history blog.
Since I've started posting here several years ago, I've been really surprised how many people visit the site.  It's essentially the story of one little county in Texas -- and yet people have loaded up stories here 300,000 times.

Here are the top 10 most-read stories on this blog (so far).  

You can click on the blue link to visit each story.
  1. Captured by Apaches -- the story of my lunch with the daughter of a man who was captured by Apaches between Fredericksburg and Mason.
  2. Solving the Mystery of the Legless Man -- several readers of this blog solved the meaning of a rather odd photograph in my collection.
  3. Why David Wampler lost -- some of my trenchant analysis of local politics.
  4. A first peek at "Peterson Plaza" -- sometimes I get to see plans early, even before they're in the newspaper.
  5. My last Kerrville Daily Times column -- I wrote 999 columns for the Kerrville Daily Times.  And then I didn't.
  6. Fairy Tale Architecture for Mrs. Florence Butt -- photos of the home of Mrs. Florence Butt, who founded what is now H-E-B.  The home looked different when it was first built than it does today.
  7. Tivy High School Pep Rallies in Downtown Kerrville -- some nice nostalgic photographs of Tivy students in the old Kerrville downtown.
  8. Arcadia Theater: Endangered Species -- the sorry story of the City of Kerrville's poor stewardship of a remarkable downtown theater.
  9. What was in their pockets? -- a column about looking deeper at an old Kerrville photograph.
  10. First peek at plans for the old Sid Peterson Property -- people really wanted to know what the City of Kerrville planned for the heart of Kerrville Old Town.
Thanks for your support of this online history series, and for your kindness.  I hope you've enjoyed it so far!
The author, back during his career
as a cowboy.
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